Foam Roller Leg Curls

Lie on your back, lift your hips up by squeezing your glutes (not arching your back), and take small steps in and out.  Sets of 6-12 will light up those hamstrings.

 

 

Side Lunge/Cossack Squat

Sports, and life, take place in multiple directions, not just forward and backward.  It just makes sense to train going side to side also.

Really 2 different exercises, but enough similarities to include together.

 

 

 

“Elbow” Rows

Normally, on rowing exercises, you want to keep your elbow close to your body (or tucked) – which is a more natural position that targets the bigger Lattisimus Dorsi muscles (lats).

 

 

But on these, you want to pull your elbow up away from your body.  This works the smaller muscles of the shoulder and upper back, so you don’t need as much weight as you would normally use.  These muscles respond well to higher volume, so I usually use reps in the 15-20 range.

 

 

 

Anterior Tibialis Raises

This is a really good use for otherwise useless 10 and 15lb kettlebells.  The anterior tibialis is the muscle that runs along the front/outside portion of your lower leg.  It’s main action is to pull your toes up towards your shin – opposite of the more well known “calf” muscles.

An imbalance between the stronger muscles in the back of your leg and the small ones in the front can be one reason people develop shin splints.  Strengthen it with exercises like this.  2-3 sets of 15-20 should work.

 

 

Stability Ball Reactive Plank

Like I’ve said a million times in other posts (Ab Training Part 1), the abdominal musculature’s main function is stabilizing your spine.  Often this needs to happen in a dynamic environment with other parts of your body moving around.  That’s where exercises like rollouts, moving planks, crawls, etc., come in to play.

This takes that idea one step further.  Hold a plank on a stability ball (an already unstable surface) and then a partner pushes the ball in different directions.  This forces you to react to an outside stimulus in order to maintain your position – applicable to all kinds of activities.